LBL: Top tips for managing it
Light Bladder Leakage (LBL) is very common amongst women of all ages. It happens when you accidentally wee a small amount due to various triggers (such as sneezing or laughing), or no trigger whatsoever. It's most commonly due to weakening of the pelvic floor muscles. We can help you get on top of LBL - have a read below.

As many as 1 in 3 women have a bladder control problem so you are in good company. If you have one or more of the following symptoms, it might be that you do have light bladder leakage - so read on as we can help you deal with this.

* Do you sometimes pee a little when you cough, laugh, sneeze or lift something heavy or play sport?
* Do you have to rush to use the toilet? Can you sometimes not quite hang on ?
* Do you sometimes not make it to the toilet in time?
* Do you every worry that you might lose control of your bladder?
* Do you wake up more than twice a night to go to the toilet?
* Do you plan your day around where the nearest toilet is?
* Do you ever feel your bladder is not quite empty?
* Do you sometimes pee a little when you change from sitting or lying down to standing up?

tip 1

Pregnancy or previous pregnancy, childbirth, hysterectomy, excessive high impact exercise, poor diet and lifestyle choices, chronic cough or constipation, some medication and medical conditions, and aging can all play a role in LBL.

DID YOU KNOW - more than 40% of women who experience bladder leakage are under 45 years old!

Incontinence is a very broad term however the two most common types are:

Stress incontinence - where leakage happens with coughing, sneezing, exercising, laughing, lifting heavy things and other movements that put pressure on the bladder. This is the most common type of incontinence.

Urge incontinence - where leakage may occur after a strong and sudden urge to urinate.This can happen when you aren't expecting it and can be brought on by triggers such as running water. It may occur for no reason at all.

Light Bladder Leakage (LBL) comes under both these types, but is lighter and less severe.


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